Leaving Cartegena put us on a quick rip out a boring interstate to a small farm just east of Tyrona National Park. The lack luster ride was a bit of a let down as it just happened to be the first time since Baja that we got to share a stretch with another rider. Our pal Nico who we'd met in Cartegena decided to cruise east with us to meet up with some friends that were hanging at a beach that was on our route. We grabbed lunch before parting ways, shared some more stories and snapped a group shot.

The farm we were making our way to was under the care of a man named Sediel. He and his family were incredibly welcoming when we arrived and showed us to some good spots to set up our tents. It was getting late and after getting settled in a bit we road over to a near by beach for a quick swim and to watch the light disappear. The Caribbean here was very different from the central american version. The tranquil sunsets we had been experiencing in Panama and the San Blas Islands gave way to choppy water and grey skies that carried a beauty all their own.

Feeling taxed from the lack of sleep in the city we both crashed out pretty quick once back to the farm. In the middle of the night we found out that we picked the worst spot on the farm to set up camp. We were right next to the chickens and just after midnight the roosters started having a hollering match that set them off every 5 minutes like the harshest alarm clock you've ever heard. That, coupled with the malaria medication we had both dosed on that night made for a wild dream ride till day break. In one I dreamt that the chickens were all surrounding my tent tearing it to shreds and then pecking and clawing at me. James confirmed that he also had the craziest dreams that night and we had a pretty good laugh about it. The kind of maniacal laugh that really means you want to kill every rooster you ever meet…

night time on the farm from my tent door

night time on the farm from my tent door

Mid-night party crew.

Mid-night party crew.

In the morning we convinced Sediel that we were pretty handy with tools and that we would love to help out around the farm. It had been a while since James and I had a chance to make something at this point and we were both stoked to get to do some work.

Spending time with Sediel was an enlightening experience. He walked and worked with meditative quality that radiated into the animals and the land that he cultivated. 

These animals love him, and the grapefruit he caries with him...

These animals love him, and the grapefruit he caries with him...

Once we got the framing for the cattle water basin roofs stuck together and cemented in the ground, we took off for an awesome waterfall Sediel was excited to show us. They were amazing to say the least and the rock bed they followed wound out of sight up and up. A friend of Sediel's met us there with some flippers and a mask that he wasn't shy about sharing. He was diving for crawfish and after he brought up some real healthy ones Sidiel got excited about cooking them up for James and I later.

Back at the farm we had a great night with Sidiel's family. There was a lot of mutual appreciation being passed around and at one point Sidiel took me off to the back of one of his fields and showed me one of his secrets with the cows. He scrambled up a grapefruit tree and started hucking them down to me. We filled a few bags and on the way back in all cattle were following us like the pied piper! Turns out they love grapefruit.

In the morning we would be packing up our gear, a bag of citrus and heading out. It was a wild feeling to be making such awesome friends here and not know if we would ever talk again. There's no internet or phone out there and no real way of getting a hold of them short of showing up again one day. I like to think that will happen.